Commonwealth Journal

Breaking News

April 15, 2013

2 killed as 2 bombs explode at Boston Marathon

Dozens of persons are seriously injured

Boston — BOSTON (AP) — Two bombs exploded near the finish of the Boston Marathon on Monday, killing two people, injuring 22 others and sending authorities rushing to aid wounded spectators, race organizers and police said.

One runner, a Rhode Island state trooper, said he saw at least two dozen people with very serious injuries, including missing limbs.

About two hours after the winners crossed the line, there was a loud explosion on the north side of Boylston Street, just before the photo bridge that marks the finish line. Another explosion could be heard a few seconds later.

The Boston Marathon said that bombs caused the two explosions and that organizers were working with authorities to determine what happened. The Boston Police Department said two people were killed and 23 others injured.

Competitors and race volunteers were crying as they fled the chaos. Bloody spectators were being carried to the medical tent that had been set up to care for fatigued runners. Authorities went onto the course to carry away the injured while stragglers in the 26.2-mile race were rerouted away from the smoking site.

Roupen Bastajian, a 35-year-old state trooper from Greenville, R.I., had just finished the race when they put the heat blanket wrap on him and he heard the first blast.

"I started running toward the blast. And there were people all over the floor," he said. "We started grabbing tourniquets and started tying legs. A lot of people amputated. ... At least 25 to 30 people have at least one leg missing, or an ankle missing, or two legs missing."

A Boston police officer was wheeled from the course with a leg injury that was bleeding.

"There are a lot of people down," said one man, whose bib No. 17528 identified him as Frank Deruyter of North Carolina. He was not injured, but marathon workers were carrying one woman, who did not appear to be a runner, to the medical area as blood gushed from her leg.

Smoke rose from the blasts, fluttering through the national flags lining the route of the world's oldest and most prestigious marathon. TV helicopter footage showed blood staining the pavement in the popular shopping and tourist area known as the Back Bay.

"There are people who are really, really bloody," said Laura McLean, a runner from Toronto, who was in the medical tent being treated for dehydration when she was pulled out to make room for victims of the explosions. "They were pulling them into the medical tent."

Cherie Falgoust was waiting for her husband, who was running the race.

"I was expecting my husband any minute," she said. "I don't know what this building is ... it just blew. Just a big bomb, a loud boom, and then glass everywhere. Something hit my head. I don't know what it was. I just ducked."

Runners who had not finished the race were diverted straight down Commonwealth Avenue and into a family meeting area, according to an emergency plan that had been in place.

 

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Breaking News
  • Boston Marathon-Explo_Shmi.jpg 2 killed as 2 bombs explode at Boston Marathon

    BOSTON (AP) — Two bombs exploded near the finish of the Boston Marathon on Monday, killing two people, injuring 22 others and sending authorities rushing to aid wounded spectators, race organizers and police said.

    One runner, a Rhode Island state trooper, said he saw at least two dozen people with very serious injuries, including missing limbs.

    About two hours after the winners crossed the line, there was a loud explosion on the north side of Boylston Street, just before the photo bridge that marks the finish line. Another explosion could be heard a few seconds later.

     

    April 15, 2013 3 Photos

  • Daniel Dissinger Investigators seek cause of fire that killed three brothers

    DANVILLE, Pa. — Authorities searched the rubble of a burned-out farm house over the weekend for the cause of a fire that took the lives of three young brothers left home alone while their widowed mother worked the overnight shift at a direct mail company.

    Two siblings, a 14-year-old girl and a 10-year-old boy, survived the early-morning Friday inferno that may have been touched off by kerosene lanterns used in the home. They ran to a neighbor’s house to ask for help and were later treated for smoke inhalation.

    A sixth child, age 4 ½, was spending the night at a friend’s house.

    Fifty firemen and emergency workers from nearby communities in Central Pennsylvania responded to the fire. By the time they arrived, the house was engulfed in flames.

    “There was just nothing left,” firefighter Ed Savidge told WNEP-TV. “It was completely gone.”

    Bodies of the victims were found among the rubble. They were identified as Daniel Dissinger, 13; Gavin Dissinger, 7, and Arthur Dissinger, 2. They were reportedly sleeping when the fire broke out.

    April 7, 2014 2 Photos

  • Jimmy Jasper with path.jpg Jimmy Jasper indicted for first-degree assault

    A Pulaski County Grand Jury has indicted James F. (Jimmy) Jasper apparently in connection with the March 5 accident on Pumphouse Road that injured himself and his daughter, 12-year-old Jaden Brooke Jasper.

    The indictment charges Jimmy Jasper with first-degree assault "by operating his vehicle in such a manner, thereby causing serious physical injury upon J.B.J and under circumstances manifesting extreme indifference to the value of a human life."

    April 3, 2013 2 Photos

  • Ferguson Tornado 0324-2013 Charlene Merriman Photo 02.jpg Freak Tornado Hits Ferguson

    A freak tornado twisted its way through Ferguson about 5:30 p.m. Sunday causing some extensive damage. The accompanying video shows the tornado tearing the roof off a building. The video was captured by a security camera at Sexton Motors. See more information Tuesday's Commonwealth Journal and on this page.

    March 25, 2013 1 Photo 1 Video

  • Richard G. Stephens.jpg RECC Chairman Rick Stephens, 3 board members including John Pruitt & board attorney resign

    In a move that stunned the staff of South Kentucky RECC, its Board Chairman, Richard G. “Rick” Stephens; Board Members John Pruitt, Jr., of Somerset, William Shearer, of Clinton County, and Charles Gore, of Russell County, along with Board Attorney Darrell Saunders of Corbin, all retired from their positions during a board meeting yesterday afternoon. Stephens was the only board member not in attendance.
    “It was like a row of dominoes,” said RECC CEO Allen Anderson who acknowledged that the resignations were a total surprise to him and other RECC staffers.
    “This is something we never expected,” Anderson said, noting that the resignations came about 5 p.m. at the end of a two-hour board meeting.
    The resignations leave the three most recently elected board members—Rick Halloran, secretary-treasurer of Somerset; Lee Coffee of northern Pulaski County; and Billy Gene Hurd, of Monticello, as the only remaining board members.

    September 13, 2012 5 Photos

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