Commonwealth Journal

Editorials

June 1, 2010

Honoring thosewho gave theirlives in service

Somerset — In the years before he was nominated to the U.S.Supreme Court by President TheodoreRoosevelt, Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. was thevoice of remembering those who served.Memorial Day became an official holiday throughan act of the federal government in 1967. But acentury earlier, ours was a nation ripped asunder bya civil war.In 1882, with the smoke from those battles barelyfaded, the first Memorial Day was celebrated.Two years later, addressing a gathering of veteransin New Hampshire, Holmes offered these words thatresonate to this day, and whose meaning will be felttoday in cemeteries across the nation and here in ourregion:“So to the indifferent inquirer who asks whyMemorial Day is still kept up, we may answer: Itcelebrates and solemnly reaffirms from year to yeara national act of enthusiasm and faith. It embodies,in the most impressive form, our belief that to actwith enthusiasm and faith is the condition of actinggreatly. To fight out a war, you must believesomething and want something with all your might.”Americans have fought wars for freedom, to opposethe threat of tyranny, to aid people of other nationswho faced oppression.Our soldiers are now battling terrorism in Iraq,Afghanistan and elsewhere around a troubled globe.Some of those soldiers will give their lives in theline of duty.They will join the long list of heroes we honor in theMemorial Days of our future.Holmes said:“Our dead brothers still live for us, and bid us thinkof life, not death – of life to which in their youth theylent the passion and joy of the spring. As I listen, thegreat chorus of life and joy begins again, and amidthe awful orchestra of seen and unseen powers anddestinies of good and evil, our trumpets sound oncemore a note of daring, hope, and will.”Today, our nation pauses to honor those who gavetheir lives protecting that ideal in which we believeand want with all our might: Liberty.We urge you to join us in remembering those whoacted greatly for their country

1
Text Only
Editorials
  • A trans fat ban helps

    November 19, 2013

  • They fight for liberty

    July 6, 2012

  • Cline Calhoun BW mug shot.jpg Total Power...

    October 13, 2011 1 Photo

  • 2011 Heart Walk: Steps in the right direction

    It's always pleasant to report good news in which our entire community can participate with positive results.
    Such is the cae with next Saturday's annual American Heart Association’s Lake Cumberland Heart Walk at Somerset High School.
    As of today, some 250 Pulaski County residents are expected to participate by — quite literally—taking positive steps to improve their health. Their goal is to  to raise $35,000 this year to fight heart disease and stroke, America’s No. 1 and No. 3 killers, respectively. However, with this encouragement, perhaps even more will join in the effort.
    The non-competitive, one- to three-mile walk begins at 10 a.m. and includes teams of employees from local companies, along with friends, family members and survivors of all ages.
    Activities will be available, including a kid’s zone, music, a survivor memorial, and helicopter appearance by Air Methods KY. Throughout the day, heart healthy snacks and information will be available.
     

    October 9, 2011

  • Tobacco drying for Opinion Page.jpg 'Golden Leaf' has lost its luster

    For many years, tobacco was the undisputed king of crops in Kentucky, but the end of the tobacco quota program in 2004, a continuing decline in the number of smokers in the United States and increased competition from foreign-grown tobacco have combined to greatly diminish tobacco’s impact on the state’s farm economy.
    To be sure, more tobacco is grown in Kentucky than any other state, but the 726 million pounds of tobacco Kentucky farmers expect to take to market this fall represent a drop of nearly 28 percent from a decade ago when 991 million pounds of tobacco were raised in the state.
    The number of cigarette consumers in the U.S. has dropped dramatically in the last two decades, and here in Kentucky, state and local governments and employers have actually encouraged the smoking decline.

    September 14, 2011 1 Photo

  • New Pulaski roads proving confusing

    If you haven’t taken a wrong turn on Pulaski County’s recently opened network of new highways, you’re definitely in the minority. Braggarts around coffee shops saying driving on the new roads is a piece of cake are branded as smart aleck city slickers.

    September 16, 2010

  • Honoring thosewho gave theirlives in service

    In the years before he was nominated to the U.S.Supreme Court by President TheodoreRoosevelt, Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. was thevoice of remembering those who served.Memorial Day became an official holiday throughan act of the federal government in 1967.

    June 1, 2010

  • ‘Human Training Wheels’

    July 2, 2009

  • Thrift is good for us, government The government needs to be more thrifty.

    June 30, 2009

  • Everbody used to love a parade Yes, those were the Good Ol’ Days; treasured memories of a time long gone.

    June 29, 2009

News Live
AP Video
Bon Jovi Helps Open Low-income Housing in Philly Pipeline Opponents Protest on National Mall Hagel Gets Preview of New High-tech Projects S.C. Man Apologizes for Naked Walk in Wal-Mart New Country Music Hall of Fame Inductees Named 'Piles' of Bodies in South Sudan Slaughter New Yorkers Celebrate Cherry Blossom Blooms SCOTUS Hears Tv-over-Internet Case Justice Dept. Broadening Criteria for Clemency Chief Mate: Crew Told to Escape After Passengers 'Miss Meadows' Takes Holmes Back to Her Roots Biden: Russia Must Stop Talking, Start Acting David Moyes Out As Manchester United Manager Raw: Leopard Bites Man in India Iowa College Finds Beauty in Bulldogs High Court to Hear Dispute of TV Over Internet Stowaway Teen Forces Review of Airport Security
Hyperlocal Search
Premier Guide
Find a business

Walking Fingers
Maps, Menus, Store hours, Coupons, and more...
Premier Guide
Stocks