Commonwealth Journal

Local News

April 4, 2013

Calling for a Unified Pulaski

Community leaders want to study feasibility feasibility of united government for city-county

(Continued)

Somerset —

Under state law, a unified government would not affect school districts, existing taxing districts in the county, or local option areas. It would not alter boundaries of precincts and legislative districts. Unified government, if approved by voters, would vacate current political positions and establish a new governing structure.
A new Somerset-Pulaski County unified government would create Kentucky’s third largest city with a population of 63,700. It would be the first unified government of its kind in Kentucky. Metro governments in Louisville and Lexington were created under different statutes, although in principle the way they operate would be similar to a merged government here, according to Schmidt.
SPCU members believe that a government here passing the 50,000 population threshold would get “looks” from businesses and industries interested in locating in larger communities. They believe it would enhance the community’s economic development efforts and assist in creating new jobs.
“A unified government would greatly increase the county’s bonding capacity,” Schmidt said, noting that the City of Somerset is approaching its bonding limits.
Somerset, with its current population of 11,296, is the 33rd largest city in Kentucky. Unified, with a population of more than 63,000, Somerset, now a third-class city, would be the third largest city in the state, qualifying for 2nd-class status.
Ping pointed out that unification, if approved by voters, is a slow-moving procedure. He estimated it would take at least four years.
“Speaking with one voice will make it easier to provide for the community’s needs,” assured State Senator Chris Girdler, who spoke in favor of the study.
“This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for all of us to stop and do three things: (1) Examine how our current local government jurisdictions work by identifying strengths and weaknesses; (2) find out how unified governments have worked in other communities around the country; and (3) consider whether unified government might work for us.”

Text Only
Local News
News Live
AP Video
Judge Ponders Overturning Colo. Gay Marriage Ban Airlines Halt Travel to Israel Amid Violence NYPD Chief Calls for 'use of Force' Retraining VA Nominee McDonald Goes Before Congress Bush: Don't Worry, Sugarland Isn't Breaking Up US Official: Most Migrant Children to Be Removed Police Probing Brooklyn Bridge Flag Switch CDC Head Concerned About a Post-antibiotic Era Raw: First Lady Says `Drink Up' More Water Courts Conflicted Over Healthcare Law Holder Urges Bipartisanship on Immigration Raw: Truck, Train Crash Leads to Fireball US Airlines Cancel Israel Flights Obama Signs Workforce Training Law Crash Victims' Remains Reach Ukraine-held City Diplomatic Push Intensifies to End War in Gaza Cat Fans Lap Up Feline Film Festival Michigan Plant's Goal: Flower and Die Veteran Creates Job During High Unemployment
Facebook
Hyperlocal Search
Premier Guide
Find a business

Walking Fingers
Maps, Menus, Store hours, Coupons, and more...
Premier Guide
Stocks