Commonwealth Journal

Local News

February 6, 2014

‘Paws-itive’ future awaits puppy mill survivors

Agencies adopting out more than 40 dogs rescued last month from Nancy kennel

Somerset —

It’s been a long journey for the more than 40 dogs and two cats seized last month from a Nancy puppy mill, but soon the animals will be heading to permanent homes. 
The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) announced Thursday that the dogs taken on Jan. 21 from the Dream Catchers Kennel, located on Ky. 196 in Nancy, will be transferred to the Kentucky Humane Society (KHS) in Louisville, Ky. and Capital Area Humane Society (CAHS) in Columbus, Ohio, to be adopted out.
“Today is a turning point for these dogs as they move towards life in a home with owners who treat them as companions,” said Jessica Rushin, partnerships manager for ASPCA Field Investigations and Response (FIR). 
The news comes after the animals spent nearly three weeks in a temporary shelter in Louisville undergoing medical evaluations and behavior tests. The ASPCA and KHS have been working together on the situation since they descended on the kennel in late January to remove the animals, which had been kept there in deplorable conditions. 
The criminal case against the kennel owner, Dennis Bradley, 61, began in Jan. 2013 after investigators with the Pulaski County Sheriff’s Department received reports that a number of dogs were being kept in cramped cages and exposed to the weather on his property. The investigation began after undercover video surfaced that had been taken at the kennel. 
Bradley operated his kennel as a non-profit agency, although he sold puppies for several hundred dollars, according to the undercover videos that were taken. When investigators with the Pulaski County Sheriff’s Department first stepped foot on the property they came across more than 60 dogs, many of them kept in small, dirty cages. Some of them were so ill they had to be euthanized. 
County officials had stated the county was unable to fund the removal of all the animals before the plea deal was reached because of limited financial resources and space. When animals are seized as part of a criminal case, they must be kept in holding as possible evidence until the case is resolved. 

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