Commonwealth Journal

News Live

July 26, 2013

This lemonade stand is for a great cause

Proceeds from Pulaski boy’s stand will go toward cancer research

Somerset —

If it’s a hot day today and you’re in the mood for some lemonade, visit 132 Hillrise Drive. It’s worth it.
Local youth Joshua Bevell is making and selling glasses of lemonade to help raise money in honor of Seth Lange, a young man whose battle with cancer is drawing national attention.
Lange, a teenager from Irvington, Ill., at Cardinal Glennon Children’s Medical Center in St. Louis, Mo., is fighting Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. A campaign to draw attention to Lange’s health crisis, called “Smiles for Seth” (find it online at www.facebook.com/SmilesforSeth) helped Joshua’s mom Tamara Bevell find the Lange family. A friendship evolved.
“I’ve been following (Lange) on Facebook for nine months now and have become friends with his family,” said Tamara. “I have an older son (Brett), who he reminds me of.”
Tamara Bevell noted that Lange is in the second round of his bout with leukemia, and is in isolation now, but he was able to find a bone marrow donor.
“He’s in a lot of pain; he’s developed sores in his mouth from chemotherapy prior to the transplant,” she said. “Now they’re just waiting for him to spike a fever. That’s how they knew the bone marrow took.”
Young Joshua Bevell, a homeschooled student, wanted to know what he could do to help and get involved. He found it through the Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation, anther organization with its roots in the fight against cancer.
“He’s a very caring kid,” said Tamara of Joshua.
According to a statement from the organization, Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation emerged from the front yard lemonade stand of cancer patient Alexandra “Alex” Scott, who passed away in 2004. In 2000, 4-year-old Alex announced that she wanted to hold a lemonade stand to raise money to help find a cure for children with cancer. Since that time, the foundation bearing her name has evolved into a national fundraising movement that’s raised more than $60 million toward the goal of finding a cure, funding over 300 research projects nationally.

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