In the end, it was just sound and fury signifying nothing — so to speak.

A nuisance ordinance concerning disturbing noises that had been in the works for months lost all momentum and was dropped during yesterday’s Pulaski County Fiscal Court meeting.

The ordinance was dropped during its second reading, after 1st district magistrate Kenny Isaacs made a motion to accept the ordinance; however, none of his fellow magistrates seconded the motion.

The ordinance related to noise as a public nuisance, and regulated sounds coming from property or vehicles that cause a disruption. If the ordinance was enacted, anyone who violates the rules could be fined no less than $25 and no more than $250 per each occurrence.

“I think four out of five magistrates stepped up to do what was right concerning us all,” said Harold Hardgrove, owner of Lake Cumberland Speedway.

“I felt good about the decision they made,” he added.

Hardgrove showed his fierce opposition to the ordinance during the last fiscal court meeting, where he told those present that he believed the new rules would cause more problems instead of solving them.

Hardgrove said he felt his strong words did make a difference in the fiscal court’s decision, and he did a lot of work to support his cause on the phone between the two court meetings.

“I think I brought some things to the attention of the magistrates that made them think,” said Hardgrove.

The owner of the speedway went on to say that he wished there was some solution to the problem that would prevent those who aren’t taking anyone else into consideration with their noise pollution from doing so without interfering with legitimate interests.

“I don’t believe people of Pulaski County understood the problems that this ordinance could have made for us,” said Hardgrove, whose speedway, home to the roar of racing cars, was protected in the ordinance as it was.

Mike Wilson, 2nd district magistrate, said that he was never for the ordinance from the beginning. Wilson said that he felt like Hardgrove did and though that the regulations could “open a can of worms,” while 3rd district magistrate Tommy Barnett explained that one of the reasons he didn’t do anything to further the ordinance was that to date, he hadn’t received any complaints in his district or from anywhere else in the county. He also said he felt the wording was unclear about the level of noise allowed, as it lacked any reference to decibel ratings.

“This would place an additional burden upon our law enforcement agencies with no way to measure the noise in the complaint,” said Barnett. “I know that law enforcement does get calls for noise complaints and I feel in most cases all parties involved are satisfied by the way the complaints were handled through the city police department or the Sheriff’s Department.”

Meanwhile, Kenny Isaacs, 1st district magistrate, said he wasn’t surprised that the ordinance he was spearheading didn’t pass.

“Any time you have something unpopular, you can’t be surprised on the outcome,” said Isaacs.

Isaacs said in his district, where there is a large density of houses, he has a problem that he was trying to take care of, and sometimes government has to step up and do what’s not popular. He added that by trying to get the noise ordinance passed, he wasn’t aiming to attack anyone’s personal freedoms.

“I think we took into careful consideration not to infringe on any businesses like Somernites Cruise and even Harold’s business (Lake Cumberland Speedway),” said Isaacs. “The intent wasn’t to hurt anyone financially but to protect everyone individually.”

Isaacs said there is already a state law on the issue related to noise, but it doesn’t have a penalty. He reported no calls in opposition to the proposed regulations, but doesn’t plan on re-visiting the issue in the near future.

In other business:

• The court approved the reappointment of Donna Turner and Joe Dungan to the Solid Waste Board for the next two years.

• The court unanimously approved the second reading of an amendment to the solid waste ordinance, making contracts between the county and the solid waste company signable.

• The court approved a resolution adopting a Memorandum of Agreement with the Governor’s Office for Local Development (GOLD) for the projects necessitated as a result of the threat of failure of the Wolf Creek Dam and the lowering of the lake elevation at Lake Cumberland.

• Concerned citizens of the Jasper Bend area spoke to magistrates bout the boat ramp there and how they needed help getting it extended.

The court let the citizens know that they are currently working to get money to fix a number of boat ramps, and the Jasper Bend site is one of those on the list. anyone financially but to protect everyone individually.”

Isaacs said there is already a state law on the issue related to noise, but it doesn’t have a penalty. He reported no calls in opposition to the proposed regulations, but doesn’t plan on re-visiting the issue in the near future.

In other business:

• The court approved the reappointment of Donna Turner and Joe Dungan to the Solid Waste Board for the next two years.

• The court unanimously approved the second reading of an amendment to the solid waste ordinance, which currently says that contracts aren’t signable.

• The court approved a resolution adopting a Memorandum of Agreement with the Governor’s Office for Local Development (GOLD) for the projects necessitated as a result of the threat of failure of the Wolf Creek Dam and the lowering of the lake elevation at Lake Cumberland.

• Concerned citizens of the Jasper Bend area spoke to magistrates bout the boat ramp there and how they needed help getting it extended.

The court let the citizens know that they are currently working to get money to fix a number of boat ramps, and the Jasper Bend site is one of those on the list.

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